Wheel of Sherries 
A short while back, Matt Piacentini, from the Beagle—an incredible bar and restaurant on the Lower East Side of NYC—contacted me to do a menu re-design in conjunction with a re-opening. Seeing as how the Beagle is one of the top places to toss back a glass of sherry in New York, the project dictated me learning a shit-ton (scientific term) about sherries via Matt and the ever-knowledgeable Dan Greenbaum, his co-owner and bar-manager.
The above image was an early idea I came up with that was to be included on the page dedicated to sherries in the new menus. Unfortunately, we ended up scrapping this particular version on account of it being too confusing/overwhelming for the average person to pick up and decipher at first glance. Instead, we decided on using a more intuitive and simple design; however, I really loved the aesthetic and feel of this one, so I’m sharing it with you here.
In essence, it’s an infographic displaying the different types of sherries and how they relate to one another. Inner sherries are the least aged/effected. The outer-most rings are the sweetest/fortified sherries.
If you’re a novice and curious about sherry (or a seasoned sherry connoisseur), I recommend you learn through experience by visiting the Beagle the next time you’re in New York City.

Wheel of Sherries

A short while back, Matt Piacentini, from the Beagle—an incredible bar and restaurant on the Lower East Side of NYC—contacted me to do a menu re-design in conjunction with a re-opening. Seeing as how the Beagle is one of the top places to toss back a glass of sherry in New York, the project dictated me learning a shit-ton (scientific term) about sherries via Matt and the ever-knowledgeable Dan Greenbaum, his co-owner and bar-manager.

The above image was an early idea I came up with that was to be included on the page dedicated to sherries in the new menus. Unfortunately, we ended up scrapping this particular version on account of it being too confusing/overwhelming for the average person to pick up and decipher at first glance. Instead, we decided on using a more intuitive and simple design; however, I really loved the aesthetic and feel of this one, so I’m sharing it with you here.

In essence, it’s an infographic displaying the different types of sherries and how they relate to one another. Inner sherries are the least aged/effected. The outer-most rings are the sweetest/fortified sherries.

If you’re a novice and curious about sherry (or a seasoned sherry connoisseur), I recommend you learn through experience by visiting the Beagle the next time you’re in New York City.